The Starving Bibliophile

Books before food (and any sort of comfortable life).

The Reformed Vampire Support Group

Summary: Think vampires are romantic, sexy, and powerful? Think again. Vampires are dead. And unless they want to end up staked, they have to give up fanging people, admit their addiction, join a support group, and reform themselves. Nina Harrison, fanged at fifteen and still living with her mother, hates the Reformed Vampire Support Group meetings every Tuesday night. Even if she does appreciate Dave, who was in a punk band when he was alive, nothing exciting ever happens. That is, until one of the group’s members is mysteriously turned to ashes…and suddenly they’re all under threat. That’s when Nina decides to prove that every vampire on earth isn’t a weak, pathetic loser. With Nina and Dave at the helm, the misfit vampires ban together to track down the culprit — and soon find themselves up against some gun-toting werewolf traffickers who’ll stop at nothing. Can a bunch of feeble couch potatoes win a fight like this?

This book will take you on a witty ride, to say the least. If the title doesn’t wrangle you in, then the concept of the book certainly will. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a book quite like this; Catherine Jinks is a unique character. Taking away all of the vampire clichés and creating something that is simple, yet distinguishable from other vampire fiction, is something that Jinks has done exceptionally well. The characters are wonderfully inventive, and they’re surprisingly relate-able. The character that I found most humorous was none other than Father Ramon, the priest that holds the support group. They treat him like a freakin’ lackey; it’s funny as heck. I guess I just find it mostly ironic. Haha. I also loved the werewolf Reuben — he was like ADHD doubled. I guess that’s what happens when you’r body has the power to shift into a creature twice your size. This book is for people who wouldn’t be caught dead with a copy of Twilight.

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This entry was posted on March 29, 2011 by in Books and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , .
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